Morality Matters

Hell’s angels inherited their eternal abode when they rebelled against God (Matthew 25.41). It is interesting how groups adopt the icons of the losing team as their mascot. Even more interesting is the American love for the culture of death. When city councils refuse to consider the moral implications of city businesses, they are protecting the culture of death. To refuse to address these issues is to sell their souls, and the souls of those in their city, to the devil… or at least to his angels.rip

On full display last Council meeting was this protection of the culture of death. Mayor Thompson is a mayor who undoubtedly cares about the people of Coolidge. Through all of our disagreements, I have never doubted the Mayor’s commitment to the people of Coolidge. Mayor Thompson bolstered his support for Mamma Jugs’ liquor license by reasoning that we wouldn’t deny Irish people (his example) the freedom to do business because they were Irish. Steve Hudson, a man I consider to be a friend, added this to the mayor’s reasoning: “If there was a gay, lesbian, transvestite people came in opened up a bar, would you discriminate against them because you don’t feel that that’s the way your life is, or what you believe in… I don’t think you would… its America, it’s a free country.”

Everyone discriminates. Every vote a council person makes is a discrimination, an action based upon what that person thinks is right for the city, or wrong for the city. To our demise, however, is the false notion that morality must never weigh into this discriminating process. The gods of Political Correctness demand that all city councils bow down and sacrifice moral convictions on their altar. How foolish. Thank you, Tatiana Murrieta, for thumbing your nose at them.

Mayor Thompson’s argument confuses categories. I would not deny an Irishman the right to do business in our city. Being born an Irishman is not a sin. I would, however, vote against the approval of a gay bar, a pornography shop, or a strip club. Those institutions represent moral issues, not civil rights. Sin creates a culture of death which will eventually die on its own- but it will take Coolidge with it. Instead of Bedford Falls we will get Pottersville.

The main premise is this: Morality matters. Every decision is a moral decision. Everyone discriminates: “Is this good for the community, or not? Will this help Coolidge, or harm? Will this decision put Coolidge in a better state, or worse?”

I would agree with Councilman Hudson’s assessment that groups are “innocent until proven guilty.” That belief is biblical. It is moral. However, that belief does not stand in a moral vacuum. Left unqualified, at some point it will cease to promote that which is good, and begin to protect that which is evil (1 Peter 2.14). At some point the community needs leaders who, like Tatiana and the woman in the crowd, stand up and say “morality matters.” This takes wisdom, courage, and conviction.

What will the people of Coolidge demand of their leaders? One lady showed up and, at great personal risk to herself, spoke truth to power. She was exactly right when she said that approving the liquor license for Mamma Jugs puts the financial security of the city in danger. I agree with her. It is a biblical premise that God’s blessings bring economic benefits, and God’s curses strip those benefits away (Deuteronomy 28). Decisions should be made in the fear of God. In other words… morality matters. Hell does have angels… they are called “fallen angels” for a reason.

Natural Law

malefemale (2)

I was quite surprised at Ryan Sorba’s rebuke of CPAC.  I was not surprised by the hateful audience that judged him.  Their words are hurtful.  They are judging him.  Why must they shout down his opinion… unless they are one of the many automatons coming out of the universities now-a-days who believe that there should not be freedom of speech.  When a position cannot be defended rationally, just scream louder… but that is argument ad baculum.

We may not agree with his ethos, but we cannot argue with his logic; Or, please give an argument from reason, not emotion.  Male and Female distinctions are probably the best example of natural law.  This was common-place thinking with the Founding Fathers, “…laws of nature and of nature’s God…”  But this then points to an objective and timeless standard, something #liberallogic must categorically dismiss.

The Treaty of Tripoli & America as a Christian Nation

John-Adams-Header

Or is it?

Today Columnist Laurie Roberts invoked the Treaty of Tripoli in her refutation of my decision to have Christian-only invocations in Coolidge City Council sessions. In fact, we anticipated this and prepared our response ahead of time. Laurie wrote that my decision was in opposition to American history itself. Her point: early American founders never called America a Christian nation. To put it in her words,

“[Rob Hudelson did not] quote the 1797 Treaty of Tripoli, submitted by President John Adams, in which he said; ‘As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion..’”
Source: http://www.azcentral.com/story/opinion/op-ed/laurieroberts/2015/09/17/coolidge-christian-public-prayer/32559085/

I’m thankful this was brought up because this quote from the treaty is often taken out of context. Two responses are necessary. First, the quote above is partial. When taken in its full context, it becomes clear that the point the treaty was making was that, to paraphrase, “America is not found on the Christian religion in the same way prior countries were founded on it.” The point being, other European nations used Christianity as an excuse to wage war solely for religious reasons. Just being a Muslim would be reason enough for, say, 18th century England to wage war on you. We, as a new nation, were not founded on Christianity in that way.

The Treaty of Tripoli was worded in this way to assure regional Muslims that American ships passing through the Mediterranean Sea were simply peaceful merchant ships intent on nothing more than economic trade and mutual benefit between trading nations.

Having prefaced our point, here is the full quote that Columnist Laurie Roberts quotes partially:

“As the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion as it has in itself no character of enmity [hatred] against the laws, religion or tranquility of Musselmen [Muslims] and as the said States [America] have never entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mahometan nation, it is declared by the parties that no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.”
Source: http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=llsp&fileName=002/llsp002.db&recNum=24

Tripoli-Treaty

The words “as it has” mean everything here. We are not founded on Christianity in the sense that we hold hatred of the Muslims or intent to wage war. We are a different kind of Christian nation.

The second point we must make is this: President John Adams, who is said to have submitted this treaty, is the same man who explicitly referred to America as a Christian nation. In his letter to Thomas Jefferson, Adams spoke plainly of the fact that, despite the various denominations of Christianity among the colonies, the authors of American Independence all united on the general principles of Christianity. In his words:

“The general Principles, on which the Fathers Achieved Independence, were the only Principles in which that beautiful Assembly of young Gentlemen could Unite, and these Principles only could be intended by them in their Address, or by me in my Answer. And what were these general Principles? I answer, the general Principles of Christianity, in which all those Sects were united: And the general Principles of English and American Liberty, in which all those young Men United, and which had United all Parties in America, in Majorities sufficient to assert and maintain her Independence.

“Now I will avow, that I then believed, and now believe, that those general Principles of Christianity, are as eternal and immutable, as the Existence and Attributes of God; and that those Principles of Liberty, are as unalterable as human Nature and our terrestrial, mundane System. I could therefore safely say, consistently with all my then and present Information, that I believed they would never make Discoveries in contradiction to these general Principles.”

Source: http://www.increasinglearning.com/general-principles.html

John-Adams

Adams went on to say that the general principles of Christianity were so profound, even secular scholars had a hard time disagreeing with them! This and many more such quotes can be found by Adams and many other Founding Fathers pertaining to the Christian foundation of America.

See also: http://allianceforreligiousfreedom.com/educate-yourself/one-nation-under-god/the-founding-fathers-on-jesus-christianity-and-the-bible/
*Referencing this site does not imply that I endorse all of its content

Conclusion
For a President who so adamantly stood firm in his conviction that America was founded on the “general principles of Christianity,” it would be shocking to think that a treaty endorsed by Adams would contain contrary language. I am sure that columnist Laurie Roberts is not trying to misquote history, she is simply another victim of the Progressive Agenda to rewrite the textbooks on American History with historical misrepresentation and omission. A talented writer, she pens many solid articles, but this one I have to disagree with.

Why I voted for a “Christian Invocation”

My response to why I voted for a “Christian Invocation”:

The Treaty of Paris concluded our war for independence. That treaty begins with, “In the Name of the most Holy & undivided Trinity.”

Treat-Of-Paris
Source: http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=6&page=transcript

The first prayer in Congress concluded with “All this we ask in the name and through the merits of Jesus Christ Thy Son and our Saviour, Amen.”

First-Prayer-Of-Congress
Source: http://chaplain.house.gov/archive/continental.html

Chief Justice Joseph Story wrote, “The real object of the First Amendment was not to countenance, much less to advance [Islam], or Judaism, or infidelity, by prostrating Christianity; but to exclude all rivalry among Christian sects [denominations], and to prevent any national ecclesiastical establishment which would give to an hierarchy the exclusive patronage of the national government.”

Joseph-Story
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Story

I am not saying anything that a Supreme Court Justice from the early 1800’s has not already said. Our heritage is a Christian heritage. State constitutions are full of references to the God of the Bible. Any honest student of history will find the fingerprints of Jesus Christ all over America. Most importantly, it is a biblical stance and God will bless the nation that honors Him (Psalm 33:12).

Can You Keep Your Religion Separate From Your Politics?

 

During one of the candidate forums I was asked a most profound question – a question that everyone must answer, not just this councilman.  “Candidate Hudelson… can you keep your religion separate from your politics?”  Great question!  It is a question that I will give a short answer to, and continue to answer while I hold this office.

The short answer:  No one keeps his religion out of his politics.  It is not possible to separate what you believe from your actions and decisions.  Everyone has a belief system and responds according to that set of beliefs.

How can I make that statement?  Aren’t Atheists without religious beliefs?  No.  They have a belief system (worldview) too.  The Bible says that all men are either for Jesus or against him (Matthew 12.30).  Which one are you?  What is your belief system?  It will show up in your decisions.